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Trooping the Colour is an annual event that takes place on Horse Guards Parade near London's St James's Park, marking The Queen's official birthday.

Trooping the Colour – A Royal Birthday Parade & an Historic Occasion for 2023

Many of us would love to have a birthday parade with marching bands, and soldiers perfectly turned out displaying their marching skills. Trooping the Colour marks Her Majesty The Queen’s official birthday. As the late Duke of Edinburgh stated, ‘it is not a “theatrical” production, (sic) it is a deadly serious demonstration of the basic infantry skills for which the British Guards are renowned across the world.’

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The Royal Observatory Greenwich. Photo Credit: © Ursula Petula Barzey.

Top 10 Reasons to Visit London’s Royal Borough of Greenwich

Designated a UNESCO World Heritage site, Greenwich provides the perfect day out for visitors wanting to escape the hustle and bustle of Central London. A short journey down river from Central London, the Royal Borough of Greenwich is home to six museums, stunning historic architecture and a wonderful range of shops, markets, pubs and restaurants.

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View of the Greenwich Park, Old Royal Naval College and Canary Wharf from the Royal Observatory Greenwich. Photo Credit: © Ursula Petula Barzey.

Uncovering the Secrets of the Old Royal Naval College in Greenwich

This year is a very good time to visit the spectacular Old Royal Naval College (ORNC), right in the heart of Greenwich, especially if you love royal and maritime history and architecture. In 2023 we are celebrating Wren 300. This is a commemoration of 300 years since the death of the great architect of the ORNC, Sir Christopher Wren, who gave his time for free when the building was commissioned in 1694. So what is the ORNC, and why should you include it on a visit to London?

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London Eye. Photo Credit: © visitlondon.com/Jon Reid.

Upon The Roof: Ten Places To See London From On High

Many visitors to London like to see the city from on high and several attractions give them the opportunity to do so. The London Eye and the viewing platform at The Shard are two of the capital’s most popular attractions, while One New Change and the Sky Garden attract people who do not wish to pay an entrance fee or wait in line to look at London from high up. Other towers, such as Arcelor Mittal Orbit in the Olympic Park and The Monument to the Great Fire, may not attract so many visitors but are important parts of London’s skyline.

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Canterbury Cathedral. Photo Credit: © Antony McCallum via Wikimedia Commons.

History of Canterbury Cathedral

Canterbury Cathedral covers 1,400 years of history and is today the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the spiritual head of the Church of England. Once one of the major pilgrimage sites in England until the Reformation in the 16th century. Today the Cathedral is renowned as having some of the finest Medieval stained glass in the country as well as being one of the great Gothic style architectural buildings dating mainly from the 11th-16th century.

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Royal Ascot

10 Events During The English Summer Social Season

“The Season” always fascinates visitors to England. An endless whirl of summer events where it’s just as important who to be seen with as to actually have fun. We asked Sophie Campbell, Blue Badge Tourist Guide and author of The Season: A Summer Whirl Through the English Social Season to give us her unique perspective on this most English of traditions.

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The British line of succession as of March 2023. Photo Credit: © Royal Family Tree.

Exploring the British Line of Succession: From Glorious Revolution to Gender Equality

The United Kingdom has a new king, King Charles III, who will be crowned this May in Westminster Abbey in a tradition dating back over 1000 years. But the King needed no Coronation to take his place as this county’s head of state, his elevation to the throne was automatic under the laws of succession, becoming King instantly upon the death of his mother, the late Queen Elizabeth II.

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25km Super Sewer being built under the River Thames. Photo Credit: © Tideway London.

Discovering London’s Hidden Depths: The Joseph Bazalgette Sewer System & The Thames Tideway

Tourist guides are normally concerned with what is above ground, but London also has a fascinating underground story. As well as the famous buildings you can see on the surface – Westminster Abbey, Saint Paul’s Cathedral, Buckingham Palace, and the Tower of London – London has a network of underground sewers and rivers that repay close attention.

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Ukrainian Soldier, Donbas 2018 at Imperial War Museum in London. Photo Credit: © Rick Jones.

Returning to the Imperial War Museum London

When the smoke cleared at the end of the First World War, or The Imperial War as it was then known (because it was fought by empires – British, German, and Russian), a shocked Britain was moved to create memorials all over the country. The Imperial War Museum was the grandest of these and was established by an Act of Parliament in 1920. The building in Waterloo was previously the Bedlam Hospital, established by Henry VIII after he dissolved the monasteries in 1533, which accounts for his name above the columned entrance. No tour is complete without him.

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Buckingham Palace. Photo Credit: ©London & Partners.

10 Royal Palaces & Homes In London

Six buildings in central London are royal palaces – but only three of these (Buckingham Palace, Kensington Palace, and Saint James’s Palace ) are still used as homes by members of the royal family. In addition, Clarence House is a royal home but not a royal palace. Three older palaces (Placentia Palace, Richmond Palace, and Nonsuch Palace) on the outskirts of London have now vanished except for memorial plaques while Windsor Castle, Hampton Court, and Kew Palace are intact and open to visitors. Windsor is the royal family’s oldest home, and where Saint George’s Chapel is the final resting place of many monarchs, including the late Queen Elizabeth I.

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Great Court at the British Museum in London. Photo Credit: © Ursula Petula Barzey.

Top 10 Objects To Surprise You At The British Museum

The British Museum is the most visited museum in London. Visitors from all over the world are drawn to the museum to see with their own eyes world-famous artefacts, such as the Rosetta Stone or the Parthenon frieze, artefacts that might have only be seen in school or art books. They also come to experience other cultures, because after all the British Museum is the museum of the world for the world. But for the discerning visitor a scratch beneath the surface of all the “celebrity” objects can reveal some real surprises. Here is my list of such surprises.

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Entrance to Victoria & Albert Museum in London. Photo Credit: © Ursula Petula Barzey.

The Birth of London’s Museum Quarter in South Kensington

South Kensington in London is synonymous with museums. Three of our best known national museums can be found here: the Natural History Museum, the Science Museum and the Victoria & Albert Museum, known affectionately to many as The V&A.

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