Blog

Blog Posts

Tower Green at the Tower of London - the most perfect village green in England. Photo Credit: © Antony Robbins.

Six Towers Inside the Tower of London

The Tower of London, the capital’s most popular tourist attraction has been a palace, fortress, prison, mint, armoury, jewel house and home to both Beefeaters and ravens. When it was built in the 11th century by Norman invaders from France, the Tower of London resembled little more than a wooden shed on a hill surrounded by a garden fence. But over the following centuries, the castle grew and grew, so that the complex that we call the Tower of London is in fact made up of 21 different towers. Here are some fascinating stories behind a few of them.

Read more
Florence Nightingale Barbie ® Part of Mattel Inspiring women TM dolls. Photo Credit: © Paul Jordan, Stylist Sheryl Fetrick.

New NHS Nightingale Hospitals

At no time in recent history have we appreciated the NHS and medical staff more than in our current crisis. Doctors, nurses and public health specialists are working flat out to save our nation. Not alone in their endeavours; we are seeing the army and teams of construction workers build new hospital facilities out of conference centres in London, Manchester and Birmingham. These new hospitals are being called Nightingale Hospitals. So, what’s behind the name?

Read more
London skyline with Big ben and the London Eye at dusk. Photo Credit: © Julian Love/Visit London Images.

Statement on Coronavirus (COVID-19)

London’s Blue Badge Tourist Guides, members of Guide London/Association of Professional Tourist Guides are acting in the best interests of visitors and locals alike by restricting our work in line with the latest advice from Public Health England. Furthermore, most tourist attractions, including museums and galleries and many pubs and restaurants, are closed. This is because the UK government has advised against all inessential travel as they work to contain COVID-19 and minimise community spread.

Read more
Walkway near Westminster Bridge looking towards Palace of Westminster & Big Ben. Photo Credit: © Ursula Petula Barzey.

Composed Upon Westminster Bridge – London’s Most Famous Poem

Blue Badge Tourist Guides in London need to have a working knowledge of some of the famous writers and poets associated with the city: William Shakespeare, Charles Dickens, William Blake, and Ben Jonson, all of whom made London their homes for at least part of their lives.

Read more
Imperial War Museum London - General view of the Atrium.

Centenary of the Imperial War Museum in London

The year 2020 marks the centenary of London’s Imperial War Museum, a site exploring the history of conflict from the First World War through the present day. Located south of the River Thames at Lambeth, the museum’s compelling exhibits help us appreciate what life was like during wartime, both for the military and for civilians.

Read more
Library at Covent Garden Hotel in London. Photo Credit: © Ursula Petula Barzey.

Where To Stay In London – An Insider’s Guide To London Neighbourhoods

Landing the accommodation just right for you is integral to your London experience, and there’s no shortage of choice. But just because London is a city that never sleeps doesn’t mean it doesn’t go to bed: rooms in sought-after hotels can be booked solid. There are some fantastic hotels around – whatever the price tag – but and always book plan ahead.

Read more
Partial view of Trafalgar Square and National Gallery in London. Photo Credit: © Ursula Petula Barzey.

London in 48 Hours – 2 Days in London Itinerary

If you’ve got just two full days in London – what were you thinking? – and you want to tick off the big-ticket attractions, plan carefully and follow the sage advice of a London Blue Badge Tourist Guide. Better yet, hire one and have them show you what you would never see on your own on a tour of Westminster Abbey, the Tower of London or even the not-so-simple-as-it-looks Changing of the Guard.

Read more
Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom. Photo Credit: © Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

The Special Occasions When the Famous Crown Jewels Leave the Tower of London

The Tower of London is one of the most popular sites in our capital city, attracting more than 2.8 million visitors a year. One of the main draws is the Jewel House, located in the heart of the Tower grounds. It contains some of the most precious gems you’re ever likely to see: the royal ceremonial regalia known as the Crown Jewels.

Read more
Spirit of Soho mural on Broadwick Street in London. Photo Credit: © Dun.can via Wikimedia Commons.

Famous Russians in London

There are half a million people of Russian descent in London, three quarters from the form Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR). Amongst them are the actors Helen Mirren, David Suchet, and Peter Ustinov, writer Stephen Poliakoff, the former politician Nick Clegg and the recently deceased opera director and television personality Jonathan Miller.

Read more
The statues of 21st century Christian martyrs on the Abbey’s West Front. Photo Credit: © Antony Robbins.

The Women of Westminster Abbey

Westminster Abbey is definitely one of London’s must-see attractions. And you’re sure to discover new things every time you visit, especially if you go with a knowledgeable Blue Badge Tourist Guide. Among other things, the Abbey is the burial site of many of the most famous people in British history.

Read more
Wedding ring shop, Hatton Garden in London. Photo Credit: © Adrian Pingstone via Wikimedia Commons.

Shopping In London For Valentine’s Day Gifts Of Love

Why is February 14th the most romantic day of the year? According to legend, Valentine was a Roman priest who defied Emperor Claudius. The emperor believed that single soldiers were more effective than married ones, but Valentine challenged the ban and continued to help young lovers, and he paid for his defiance with his life on this very day.

Read more
Entrance to Veeraswamy Indian Restaurant in London. Photo Credit: © Alex Muller via Wikimedia Commons.

History of Curry in London & Best Indian Restaurants In London

Visitors to London often want to try Indian food, one of Britain’s most popular cuisines. The United Kingdom celebrates National Curry Week every October. Although curry is an Indian dish modified for British tastes, it is such a favourite with locals that it contributes more than £5 billion to the British economy. Hence it was hardly surprising when in 2001, Britain’s Foreign Secretary referred to chicken tikka as a true British national dish.  Read on for some tips on the best places for Indian food in the capital, as well as some fascinating history and fun facts – including which restaurant shares a birthday with Her Majesty the Queen.

Read more