Tina Engstrom

Sonia Delaunay Exhibition at Tate Modern

A new exhibition at Tate Modern will showcase the work of Sonia Delaunay (1885–1979) who was a key figure in the Parisian avant-garde and became the European doyenne of abstract art.

Throughout the first half of the twentieth century, she celebrated the modern world of movement, technology and urban life, exploring new ideas about colour theory together with her husband Robert Delaunay.

This will be the first UK retrospective to assess the breadth of her vibrant artistic practice across
a wide range of media. It will feature the groundbreaking paintings, textiles and clothes she made across a sixty-year career, as well as the results of her innovative collaborations with poets, choreographers and manufacturers, from Diaghilev to Liberty. The Sonia Delaunay exhibition at Tate Modern is on
15 April – 9 August 2015. 

Prismes Electriques 1914

Prismes Electriques 1914. Photo: ©Pracusa 2013057, ©CNAP.

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