Victoria Herriott

Dippy at Natural History Museum in peril as museum is given £5M

The Natural History Museum has received its largest donation but a much-loved feature, a dinosaur replica, Dippy could be removed. Sir Michael Hintze gave the London museum £5m to improve galleries and aid research.

In recognition, the museum has named its central atrium ‘Hintze Hall’ and started a multi-million-pound redevelopment over the next three years. However, the redevelopment could see the removal of Dippy. The feature is a near-complete model of a Diplodocus carnegii uncovered in the USA in 1898. Sir Michael, who founded CQS Asset Management, has also donated millions to the Victoria & Albert Museum and the National Gallery.

Natural History Museum Dippy in The Central Hall at Natural History Museum. Photo: © natural History Museum.

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Victoria Herriott

I like my guiding to be as varied as possible and enjoy guiding children, students and senior citizens. I work with individuals and families using chauffeur cars, and with overseas groups attending conferences or on business trips. I try to remember that most people are taking a tour as…

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