Tina Engstrom

Cambridge University Library Celebrates 600th Anniversary

Cambridge University Library is celebrating its 600th anniversary with an exhibition featuring its most valuable treasures, including Halley’s handwritten notebook with his original drawing of the comet path, Darwin’s first sketch of his primate tree from ‘On the Origin of Species’ and pictures of stars viewed clearly for the first time through Galileo’s hand-made telescope.

Cambridge University Library also has two copies of the Gutenberg Bible which started the print revolution. The first edition of Newton’s Principia with the scientist’s feverish notes is the highlight of ‘Lines of Thought: Discoveries that Changed the World.’

Many works have never been displayed and it will also include a 2nd-century fragment of Homer’s Odyssey, Stephen Hawking’s draft of ‘A Brief History of Time’ and a 2,000-year-old copy of the Ten Commandments.

To find out more about 600th-anniversary celebrations, visit the Cambridge University Library website.

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