Tina Engstrom

UK Pavilion from Milan Expo 2015 Finds New Home at Kew Gardens

After a spectacular run as the centrepiece of the gold medal winning UK Pavilion at the 2015 Milan Expo, UK Trade & Investment (UKTI) and Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, have announced that The Hive will take up its new home within Kew Gardens from June 2016.

Soaring 17 metres in the air, The Hive is an immersive, multi-sensory experience inspired by groundbreaking UK scientific research into the health of bees. The aluminium structure will draw visitors into the space via a wildflower meadow, as though they were worker bees returning to the hive. The wildflower meadow will serve to build understanding and appreciation of these habitats, and their significance for insect pollinators.
Kew Gardens - The Hive designed by Wolfgang Buttress and created by BDP, Simmonds Studio and Stage One.  Photo Credit:  ©Mark Hadden.
Royal Botanic Gardens Kew – The Hive designed by Wolfgang Buttress and created by BDP, Simmonds Studio and Stage One. Photo Credit: ©Mark Hadden.

Hundreds of glowing LED lights bring this 40-tonne lattice structure to life, while a symphony of orchestral sounds fills the air. Triggered by vibration sensors within a real beehive, the sound and light intensity within the pavilion increases as the energy levels in the living hive surge, giving visitors an incredible insight into the ever-moving life of a bee colony.

As visitors wander through this continually changing space, they will be exploring the vital role of bees and other pollinators in feeding the planet – of the 100 crop species that provide 90% of food worldwide, 70 are pollinated by bees.

You may also like

Brian Barnes Murals In Battersea, South London

Few people are as passionate about the Battersea area of London than muralist Brian Barnes MBE, who for the last forty-five years has been leaving his artistic touch on derelict industrial carcasses and council housing estates, some in plain sight and others in the most inconspicuous of locations. He first gained recognition in 1976 with his 267 foot long mural: Battersea: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, on Battersea Bridge Road, which depicted a brush sweeping away the industrial dilapidation along Battersea’s riverfront, and replacing it with a colourful utopian vision of social prosperity for the local community.

Read more

At Home With Jimi Hendrix - Exploring The London Lodgings Of A Rock And Roll Icon

Fifty years ago this month, we lost one of the greatest musicians of all time. Jimi Hendrix died in Notting Hill, on 18 September 1970. Johnny Allen Hendrix was born on 27 November 1942 in Seattle. He became “Jimi” only later. He had a diverse lineage with African-American and Native American roots. His grandmother Nora was said to be one-quarter Cherokee. Early 20th-century photos reveal her fine features, which bear a striking resemblance to those of her grandson.

Read more