Jeanie Carmichael

Crocker’s Folly Restored

The fabulous Grade II-listed gin palace Crocker’s Folly in St John’s Wood has been beautifully restored as a restaurant and bar.  The establishment has 50 kinds of marble, Romanesque columns, cut glass chandeliers and carved mahogany. 

It was built by local entrepreneur Frank Crocker in 1898 to serve the projected Great Central Railway terminus, which was eventually located at Marylebone. The legend that Mr Crocker committed suicide by throwing himself out of an upstairs window is untrue: he died aged 41 of natural causes. However, his ghost is reputed to haunt the building, which has been exquisitely restored with 50 different kinds of marble and cut-glass chandeliers.  

Crocker's Folly

Crocker’s Folly: Exterior. Photo: ©Crocker’s Folly.

Crocker's Folly

Crocker’s Folly: Dinning Room. Photo: ©Crocker’s Folly.

Crocker's Folly

Crocker’s Folly: Delicious Cured Beef Fillet with Whipped Brie, Charred Shallots and Salt Baked Beetroot. Photo: ©Crocker’s Folly.

Jeanie Carmichael

For 25 years I have enjoyed guiding a variety of guests, both individuals and groups, mainly in London but also in the UK, Eire and Europe. I am proud to have won the BITOA award for Guide of the Year. I have conducted a number of special interest groups,…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may also like

History of Curry in London & Best Indian Restaurants In London

Visitors to London often want to try Indian food, one of Britain’s most popular cuisines. The United Kingdom celebrates National Curry Week every October. Although curry is an Indian dish modified for British tastes, it is such a favourite with locals that it contributes more than £5 billion to the British economy. Hence it was hardly surprising when in 2001, Britain’s Foreign Secretary referred to chicken tikka as a true British national dish.  Read on for some tips on the best places for Indian food in the capital, as well as some fascinating history and fun facts - including which restaurant shares a birthday with Her Majesty the Queen.

Read more

Afternoon Tea in London

What could be more quintessentially English than afternoon tea? This is often one of the top items on London visitors’ itineraries, but many are unsure of where to go or surprised by how expensive it can be. I’ve been enjoying and writing about the afternoon tea ceremony since I first moved to London nearly 30 years ago. How times have changed! The landscape has grown, both in terms of price range and creativity of menus. Restaurants and hotels have become more imaginative with themed teas, such as the Mad Hatter Tea at the Sanderson Hotel and the fashion-orientated Pret-a-Portea at the Berkeley.

Read more