Edwin Lerner

The Final Journey Of The Unknown Warrior At Westminster Abbey

The most emotionally powerful story I tell as a Blue Badge Tourist Guide is that of the Unknown Warrior – a single British soldier who through his anonymity came to represent hundreds of thousands of British soldiers killed during the First World War.

That story is now a century old. One hundred years ago the Unknown Warrior arrived home – back in Britain from the battlefield where he fell. Today will be the hundredth anniversary of his funeral procession through London and the beginning of what became known as the Great Pilgrimage to his grave.

In this video, initially broadcast via the Guide London social media channels, I tell the story of the Warrior’s final journey, from the battlefields of Europe to the grave in the nave of Westminster Abbey on 11th November 1920. There the Warrior lies, honoured by Kings and Queens, by Presidents and Prime Ministers, representing all who have given their life for their country.

For a more in-depth virtual tour and discussion of The Final Journey of The Unknown Warrior and the Story of Remembrance, get in touch via my Guide London profile!

Edwin Lerner

Named Edwin (an early king of Northern England) but usually called ‘Eddie’, I conducted extended tours around Britain and Ireland for many years and now work as a freelance guide and tour manager with a little writing and editing on the side.  I specialise in public transport and walking…

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