Karen Sharpe

47 New Blue Plaques for Iconic Musicians & Venues

To celebrate BBC Music last month the BBC Local Radio stations and Asian Network in England teamed up with the British Plaque Trust to unveil forty-seven historic Blue Plaques celebrating iconic musicians and venues. Several are in London and include:

Soho – David Bowie was honoured with a blue plaque outside the Soho studios where he recorded Hunky Dory, The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars. The plaque is on the Trident Studios which shut in 1981 after recording some of the biggest names in music – The Bee Gees, the Rolling Stones, Queen, Lou Reed and Frank Zappa. It was also here that The Beatles recorded Hey Jude in 1968.

David Bowie Blue Plaque in Soho

The Buttery, North Kensington sees a plaque to Emile Ford whose famous song was ‘What Do You Want to Make Those Eyes at Me For’. The singer, producer and sound scientist made his performing debut at The Buttery in 1957 and became the first black British male artist to have a number one hit and million-seller.

Brick Lane has a plaque to Haroon Shamsher the founder of pioneering collective League of Joi Bangla Youth, later the Joi Bangla sound system. In the 1980s, with his brother Farook, he ran a traditional tape shop in London’s East End. The group’s aim was to fuse traditional Bengali music with the energetic funk attack of James Brown.

Another plaque in Brick Lane is for Saifullah ‘Sam’ Zaman (1965-2015) a London- based DJ of Bengali heritage who created music as State of Bengal for over two decades. He first rose to prominence off the back of a couple of tracks, Flight IC408 and Chittagong Chill and has gone on tour with Bjork. He also remixed for high profile artists such as Massive Attack (Mezzanine) and Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan.

Blue plaques outside London can be found at:

Brighton Dome where Abba won the Eurovision Song Contest for Sweden in 1974.

Chipping Norton Recording Studios (now Blue Horizon) where Status Quo, XTC, Gerry Rafferty, Duran Duran, Steve Winwood, Beverley Craven and Radiohead all recorded.

Salisbury – the Gaumont Theatre where Buddy Holly and The Crickets played in March 1958.

Maidstone, Kent – Royal Star Hotel where Bowie played in his early band the Manish Boys.

Karen Sharpe

I was born in London and have lived there for most of my life although I have now ‘decamped’ to what is known as the suburbs.
I have worked for an antiques removal/shipping company before joining the Metropolitan Police Force where I enjoyed a varied career for 14years. Since leaving I followed up…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may also like

An American President in Ealing

The Little Ealing History Group publishes  An American President in Ealing: The John Quincy Adams Diaries 1815 to 1817 The Little Ealing History Group has published a unique local history book based on the diaries of John Quincy Adams, a leading nineteenth-century American statesman and diplomat.

Read more

Totally Thames Festival 2014: 2 - 20 September

Be prepared for a large surprise on the Thames River at Nine Elms this September.   What surprise exactly?  Well Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman is preparing his first UK commission.  This will be semi-immersed in the Thames, and will rise and fall with the tide.   Almost certainly it will be large.  Very large.  It is closely under wraps until 2 September, when it will be transported along the Thames, and is likely to be a talking point in the up and coming Vaxhall area.  Hofman is famous for large scaled up sculptures of everyday objects.  Not surprisingly his 26-metre high inflatable “Rubber Duck” has been the focus of much attention in a variety of cities, including Auckland, Sao Paolo and Osaka.

Read more